History of Herpetological Conservation and Biology

Recent Changes at Herpetological Conservation and Biology (2016)

New distinguished Associate Editors and changing of the guard with two promotions to Chelonian Section Co-Editors.

 

Read more

Herpetological Conservation and Biology in our Tenth Year (2015)

Join us in celebrating the successful completion of our 10th year of publishing Herpetological Conservation and Biology!

 

Read more

Herpetological Conservation and Biology Incorporated (2014)

The Governing Board is pleased to announce that on 18 September 2014 Herpetological Conservation and Biology received its corporate charter as a nonprofit from the State of Nevada (Entity #: E0484052014-9). Our Federal Employer Identification Number (EIN) is 26-0289799.

 

Read more

Herpetological Conservation and Biology Continues to Grow (2013)

As a result of ever increasing submission rates between 2006 and 2013, each year we add more Section Editors, Assistant Editors, and Associate Editors as well as manuscript lay-out and production staff.

 

Read more

Recent Decisions and Developments at Herpetological Conservation and Biology (2013)

Governing Board meeting decisions and developments on 14 July 2013 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

 

Read more

Avoiding Potential Conflicts: Editors Publishing in HCB (2012)

Editor contributions comprise approximately 6% of the articles in Herpetological Conservation and Biology. We strive for continued fair, rigorous, and timely assessment of manuscripts. All submitted manuscripts are evaluated based on scientific merit alone.

 

Read more

 

Thomson Reuters reports 2-year and 5-year Impact Factors for Herpetological Conservation and Biology (2012)

Herpetological Conservation and Biology has received its first Thomson Reuters impact factor.  Journal Citation Reports calculated a 2-year impact rating of 0.62 and a 5-year impact rating of 0.76.

 

Read more

 

Changing Some of the Guard at Herpetological Conservation and Biology (2012)

The success of Herpetological Conservation and Biology is once again necessitating some additional staff and organizational changes that we trust will improve our ability to serve the herpetological community.  Thus, we would like to welcome aboard some new colleagues and report two moves within the editorial staff.

 

Read more

 

Herpetological Conservation and Biology to be Included in Journal Citation Reports (2010)

The Governing Board of Herpetological Conservation and Biology is pleased to announce that we received the following correspondence from Thomson-Reuters: "...I am happy to inform you that your journal "Herpetological Conservation and Biology" has been selected for coverage in the following Thomson
Reuters products: Current Contents/Agriculture, Biology& Environmental Sciences, JCR, and SCIE..."

 

Read more

 

Herpetological Conservation and Biology:  Metamorphosis  (2010)

Throughout the first five years of Herpetological Conservation and Biology, our website changed continuously.  Being a new online journal, we repeatedly tried different looks, themes, and formats.  The end result, however, was a website that clearly lacked a cohesive identity! 


Read more


Herpetological Conservation and Biology:  Milestones  (2009)

With this second issue of Volume 4 of Herpetological Conservation and Biology, we have accomplished a few more milestones.  First, as of this issue, we are growing from two to three issues per year.  Our continued success is the direct result of your acceptance, submissions, and participation – authors, editors, reviewers, and readers alike.  For this, we thank you.  The world is changing. I cannot remember the last time I received a reprint request by "snail mail." Instead, they arrive by e-mail now.  These days, most of our colleagues want virtually instantaneous access to a PDF rather than a hard copy reprint.  Today, I could easily carry my entire reference library of 3,000+ research papers on a flash drive in my pocket. I have begun to wonder about the office space consumed by my two filing cabinets of reprints. Still, I like having the hard copies…if only for nostalgic reasons.

Read more

 

Herpetological Conservation and Biology:  A Successful First Year  (2007)

How does one measure the success of a new journal?  With traditional journals, societies can point to current membership trends, institutional subscriptions, and/or citation indices.  Success can, for instance, be inferred by whether or not membership in a society is increasing or decreasing. For an online, open-access journal such as ours, however, there is no distinguished society to join.  In fact, Herpetological Conservation and Biology has no user fees whatsoever! So why would a researcher ever consider submitting a manuscript to a new, unproven, online journal?  The objective of this editorial is to reveal various statistics pertaining to the users of Herpetological Conservation and Biology.  These statistics will enable potential authors to make informed decisions about publishing in our online open-access journal.  For instance, our website statistics reveal that, in just 12 months, visitors have downloaded the 32 papers published thus far a total of 25,749 times.

Read more

 

Dawning of Herpetological Conservation and Biology:  A Special Introduction to Your New Journal  (2006)

Inception of a new journal in herpetology is a rare event.  The first discussion of developing a journal with an emphasis on natural history and conservation occurred among a subset of us (McCallum, others), while at the 2005 joint annual meeting of the SSAR/HL/ASIH in Tampa, Florida.  Some of the initial questions we posed for a new herpetological journal were as follows: (1) is there a need; (2) audience; and (3) support? If any one of these did not exist, then the concept should be abandoned or modified.  We critically examined these questions through discussions with many individuals and informal surveys performed on the Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (PARC) listserver and other forums.  Early on, it was obvious to us that there was strong demand for an outlet serving natural history, field ecology and conservation studies, especially descriptive investigations and management case studies that appeared to lack a home in other journals.  The road traveled since those discussions has been fast paced, culminating in this 2006 launch of Herpetological Conservation and Biology.

Read more